Yours Truly Giving a Lovenox Injection, Close Up

Lovenox injectionThe photo here shows my hands, giving a Lovenox injection to my wife, in her belly. It’s supposed to go into a fleshy, fatty area, so the stomach is deemed as the best place to do it. (There’s some discussion as to whether it goes in the stomach or the love handles, but we’re in the same general area).

The Lovenox (enoxaparin ) is “is used to prevent blood clots in the leg in patients who are on bedrest or who are having hip replacement, knee replacement”, and it’s also used to prevent clots in people who have already got them from build-up on a PICC line.

Here’s how it’s done:

Your health care provider will teach you how to give yourself the shot or arrangements will be made for someone else to give you the shot. Enoxaparin is usually injected in the stomach area. You must use a different area of the stomach each time you give the shot. If you have questions about where to give the shot, ask your health care provider. Each syringe has enough drug in it for one shot. Do not use the syringe and needle more than one time. Your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider will tell you how to throw away used needles and syringes to avoid accidental injury. Keep syringes and needles out of reach of children.

To inject enoxaparin, follow these instructions:

  1. Wash your hands and the area of skin where you will give the shot.
  2. Look at the syringe to be sure the drug is clear and colorless or pale yellow.
  3. Take the cap off the needle. Do not push any air or drug out of the syringe before giving the shot unless your health care provider tells you to.
  4. Lie down and pinch a fold of skin between your finger and thumb. Push the entire needle into the skin and then press down on the syringe plunger to inject the drug. Hold onto the skin the entire time you give the shot. Do not rub the site after you give the shot.

Feeling a bit better

I talked with Dr Rossetti yesterday, and yes, he had seen all of these symptoms that Beth was experiencing, no, none of them, taken alone, is all that serious, and yes, all of these taken together have weakened her and will likely make her recovery somewhat longer.

Preparing for Catheter #3That said, she was feeling a bit better yesterday and this morning, though the clot is still a worry, and her hand had swelled up a bit more.

By the way, did you notice her smiling in this photo? She has always smiled nicely for photos, and she did so here, even though she was dreading the thought of having another central line put in. This one was her third, plus the clot-inducing PICC line in her arm.

Finally, I had a chance to sneak Dani into the hospital for a few minutes last night. The policy is “no children under 12” in the room, though even Dr Rossetti has allowed us to break that rule on occasion. Still, it made for a nice moment for both girls.

Beth and Dani
Beth and Dani